To My Cambodian Fans From Around the World

WOMEN IN MOTION DOCUMENTARY ABOUT SPACE (DO YOU REMEMBER STAR TREK?)

The Nichelle Nichols Documentary: WOMAN IN MOTION is out and Streaming Across the Universe!

My good friend Ivor Dawson from the “Traveling Space Museum.” Is in this new documentary.  He has been supporting Nichelle Nichols for several years and he is currently helping me with the Barboza Space Center’s First School on Mars astronaut training program.   I am suggesting to all of my followers to take a look at this new documentary on Amazon Prime.  Nichelle. From Star

A Message from Ivor Dawson:

The wait is over. Woman in Motion has been released—just in time for Women in History Month.  If you’re a Star Trek or Nichelle Nichols fan or a friend of mine or Traveling Space Museum—this movie is great—and I’m not saying this because I’m in it! Rotten Tomatoes gave it a 95% rating and it’s #5 on iTunes’ Documentaries List.  The film is already a hit! George Lucas loved the project so much that he offered his services at Skywalker Ranch to mix the sound—so we know that the force is with us! 

As a friend, confidante and speechwriter for Ms. Nichols for more than two decades, the producers thought that I might have a few thoughts to contribute.  And speaking of George Lucas,  a year ago, when the film was completed—about a week before COVID arrived, the producers and I autographed a Woman in Motion lobby poster that went to our friends at Skywalker Ranch. Seeing my name on the official poster was another surprise thrill.   

Right now, you can catch Woman in Motion streaming on iTunes for rent or sale and on Amazon Prime video. Many who saw it on Amazon Prime were able to see it for free!

Hope you all can catch it soon. And when you do, please write and tell me what you think. Live long and prosper!

Ivor

I would love to get your feedback of this documentary and if you want more like this stay tuned to Kids Talk Talk Radio Science with some of the links below.

All the best,

Bob Barboza

Suprschool@aol.com.

 Kids Talk Radio Science

http://www.KidsTalkRadioScience.com

http://www.FristSchoolonMars.com

http://www.Twitter.com/BobBarboza

To My Star Trek Fans in Cambodia

WOMEN IN MOTION DOCUMENTARY ABOUT SPACE (DO YOU REMEMBER STAR TREK?)

The Nichelle Nichols Documentary: WOMAN IN MOTION is out and Streaming Across the Universe!

My good friend Ivor Dawson from the “Traveling Space Museum.” Is in this new documentary.  He has been supporting Nichelle Nichols for several years and he is currently helping me with the Barboza Space Center’s First School on Mars astronaut training program.   I am suggesting to all of my followers to take a look at this new documentary on Amazon Prime.  Nichelle. From Star

A Message from Ivor Dawson:

The wait is over. Woman in Motion has been released—just in time for Women in History Month.  If you’re a Star Trek or Nichelle Nichols fan or a friend of mine or Traveling Space Museum—this movie is great—and I’m not saying this because I’m in it! Rotten Tomatoes gave it a 95% rating and it’s #5 on iTunes’ Documentaries List.  The film is already a hit! George Lucas loved the project so much that he offered his services at Skywalker Ranch to mix the sound—so we know that the force is with us! 

As a friend, confidante and speechwriter for Ms. Nichols for more than two decades, the producers thought that I might have a few thoughts to contribute.  And speaking of George Lucas,  a year ago, when the film was completed—about a week before COVID arrived, the producers and I autographed a Woman in Motion lobby poster that went to our friends at Skywalker Ranch. Seeing my name on the official poster was another surprise thrill.   

Right now, you can catch Woman in Motion streaming on iTunes for rent or sale and on Amazon Prime video. Many who saw it on Amazon Prime were able to see it for free!

Hope you all can catch it soon. And when you do, please write and tell me what you think. Live long and prosper!

Ivor

I would love to get your feedback of this documentary and if you want more like this stay tuned to Kids Talk Talk Radio Science with some of the links below.

All the best,

Bob Barboza

Suprschool@aol.com.

 Kids Talk Radio Science

http://www.KidsTalkRadioScience.com

http://www.FristSchoolonMars.com

http://www.Twitter.com/BobBarboza

Robots Teaching Yoga in Cambodia

We live in Long Beach, California and we have lots of Cambodian students in our classrooms.  All the schools are closed.  We asked our robots to help teach schools online.

Cambodia we need your help with climate change.

Kids Talk Radio Science will join the fight with world youth.  

 Young protesters around globe demand climate change action

BY ROD MCGUIRK AND FRANK JORDANS / ASSOCIATED PRESS

Published: Friday, September 20th, 2019 at 10:39am

Updated: Friday, September 20th, 2019 at 10:49am

Climate protesters demonstrate in London, Friday, Sept. 20, 2019. Protesters around the world joined rallies on Friday as a day of worldwide demonstrations calling for action against climate change began ahead of a U.N. summit in New York. (AP Photo/Frank Augstein)

DEVELOPING… Story will be updated as new information can be verified. Updated 3 times

Get alerts from Albuquerque Journal about this news.

BERLIN — A wave of climate change protests swept across the globe Friday, with hundreds of thousands of young people sending a message to leaders headed for a U.N. summit: The warming world can’t wait for action.

Marches, rallies and demonstrations were held from Canberra to Kabul and Cape Town to Copenhagen, and more were set to follow as the day went on.

The Global Climate Strike” events ranged from a gathering of about two dozen activists in Seoul using LED flashlights to send Morse code messages calling for action to rescue the earth to demonstrations around Australia that organizers estimated were the country’s largest protests since the Iraq War in 2003.

“Even though we ourselves aren’t sick, the planet which we live on is, and we are protesting and fighting for it,” said Siobhan Sutton, a 15-year-old student at Perth Modern School.

The protests were partly inspired by the activism of Swedish teenager Greta Thunberg, who has staged weekly demonstrations under the heading “Fridays for Future” over the past year, calling on world leaders to step up their efforts against climate change.

“It’s such a victory,” Thunberg said in an interview Friday with The Associated Press in New York. “I would never have predicted or believed that this was going to happen, and so fast — and only in 15 months.”

Thunberg is expected to participate in a U.N. Youth Climate Summit on Saturday and speak at the U.N. Climate Action Summit with global leaders on Monday.

“They have this opportunity to do something, and they should take that,” she said in the interview. “And otherwise, they should feel ashamed.”

The world has warmed about 1 degree Celsius (1.8 Fahrenheit) since before the Industrial Revolution, and scientists have attributed more than 90 percent of the increase to emissions of heat-trapping gases from fuel-burning and other human activity.

Scientists have warned that global warming will subject Earth to rising seas and more heat waves, droughts, powerful storms, flooding and other problems, and that some have already started manifesting themselves.

Nations around the world agreed at a 2015 summit in Paris to hold warming to less than 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 Fahrenheit) more than pre-industrial-era levels by the end of this century.

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However, U.S. President Donald Trump subsequently announced that he was withdrawing the U.S. from the agreement, which he said benefited other nations at the expense of American businesses and taxpayers.

Trump referred to global warming as a “hoax” before becoming president. He has since said he’s “not denying climate change” but is not convinced it’s manmade or permanent.

The U.N. summit is aimed at eliciting concrete proposals from various countries to make progress toward the Paris goal.

Friday’s demonstrations started in Australia, where organizers estimated 300,000 protesters marched in 110 towns and cities, including Sydney and the national capital, Canberra. Demonstrators called for their country, the world’s largest exporter of coal and liquid natural gas, to take more drastic action to reduce greenhouse gas emissions.

Hundreds of rallies took place across Europe, including in the Czech Republic, Germany, Britain and Poland, which is still widely coal-reliant and where many middle schools gave students the day off to enable them to participate in the rallies in Warsaw and other cities.

In Berlin, police said more than 100,000 people gathered in front of the capital’s landmark Brandenburg Gate, not far from Chancellor Angela Merkel’s, office where the Cabinet thrashed out the final details of a 54 billion euro ($60 billion) plan to curb Germany’s greenhouse gas emissions .

Thousands of schoolchildren and their adult supporters demonstrated in London outside the British Parliament, some holding home-made placards with slogans including “Don’t be a fossil fool” and “Make our planet Greta again,” in a reference Thunberg.

The British government said it endorsed the protesters’ message but didn’t condone skipping school — a stance that didn’t sit well with some of the young protesters.

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“If politicians were taking the appropriate action we need and had been taking this action a long time ago when it was recognized the world was changing in a negative way, then I would not have to be skipping school,” said Jessica Ahmed, a 16-year-old London student.

In Helsinki, the Finnish capital, a man dressed as Santa Claus stood outside parliament holding a sign: “My house is on fire, my reindeer can’t swim.”

Smaller protests took place in Asia, including in Japan, South Korea, the Philippines, Hong Kong and India.

“We need to reclaim our constitutional right to clean air and water,” said Aman Sharma, a 16-year-old protester in India’s capital of New Delhi.

In Tokyo, hundreds of students and environmental activists marched through the business and shopping district of Shibuya, chanting “Climate Justice!” while holding hand-painted placards with messages such as “Go Green” and “Save the Earth.”

Smaller rallies were held in more than a dozen other cities around Japan, including Kyoto, the nation’s ancient capital that hosted the 1997 climate conference.

And in the Afghan capital, Kabul, an armored personnel carrier was deployed to protect about 100 young people as they marched, led by a group of several young women carrying a banner emblazoned with “Fridays for Future.”

Fardeen Barakzai, one of the organizers and head of the local climate activist group, Oxygen, said Afghan youths “know the problem of climate change. We know war can kill a group of people. … The problem in Afghanistan is our leaders are fighting for power, but the real power is in nature.”

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In Africa, rallies were held in Johannesburg and the South African capital, Pretoria, as well as Kenya’s capital, Nairobi, where some young protesters wore hats and outfits made from plastic bottles to emphasize the dangers of plastic waste, a major threat to cities and oceans.

Climate change “is worse than homework,” one sign proclaimed.

Africa is the most vulnerable continent to climate change and the least equipped to deal with it, experts have said. Governments have pleaded for more support from the international community.

More rallies were planned later Friday in the United States, where organizers say more than 800 events were expected.

___

McGuirk reported from Canberra, Australia. Associated Press reporters around the world contributed to this report.

 

 

Who is designing robots in Cambodia?

2nd Annual Robot Showcase Master 165:166.Boz.jpeg

 

Would you consider showcasing your robot online?  You can participate with us from a distance.   We have room for you in our new online showcase.   If you would like to participate in person we can make that happen.  There is no charge to participate.  We love robots and we want to share this passion with everyone for free.

Contact: Bob Barboza, Suprschool@aol.com or visit: http://www.BarbozaSpaceCenter.com,

http://www.BarbozaSpaceCenter.WordPress.com.

 

We have been looking at great robots all year.    We are talking with California’s top robot designers.   The Robot Showcase is a great place to bring the entire family.

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Cambodia Join the International Occupy Mars Band

The Physics of Electronic Music: A Photo Essay By Bob Barboza

Music and science come together for the new visual jazz opera about the planet Mars.

Bob Barboza is selecting instruments for the “Occupy Mars Band Concert” in the USA.  He went to the NAMM Show in southern California to talk with musicians and instrument designers from around the world.   Some of the musicians will appear as soloists for Bob’s new visual jazz opera on the topics of  Mars and are we alone in the universe.  We continue to search for original compositions and writers on the topics of deep space and Mars.   For more information contact Suprschool@aol.com.

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What about artificial intelligence?

Artificial Intelligence Is Attracting Investors, Inventors, and Academic Researchers Worldwide

The researchers at the Barboza Space Center are paying close attention to how artificial intelligence will play a role in the future of going to school on Mars.  Our team will be exploring how AI can help on the Cabo Verde Islands.  This is the first of  a series of articles.  You might find this article by Sean Cavanagh interesting.   http://www.BarbozaSpaceCenter.com

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Senior Editor

If entrepreneurs and futurists are to be believed, artificial intelligence will have a transformative impact on many aspects of society–with uncertain implications for education.

A new report attempts to get beyond the prognostication and offer a precise gauge of where AI’s development stands right now, as judged by a variety of metrics across research and industry in the U.S. and internationally.

The AI Index 2018 Annual Report was produced by a group of researchers, led by Yoav Shoham, a professor emeritus of computer science at Stanford University. The measures in the report are not directly related to K-12 education, though some, such as the growth in venture capital and academic research, seem likely influence the development of AI in school settings.

One measure outlined in the report is the publication of AI-focused academic papers, where the release of research focused on artificial intelligence topics has outpaced the amount of published research on computer science over roughly the past two decades.

The interest in artificial intelligence in academia is not limited to the United States. Europe has consistently produced the largest number of AI papers, currently about 27 percent of them, according to the report, followed by China (25 percent) and United States (17 percent).  But the number of papers published in China jumped by 150 percent between 2007 and 2017.

About 30 percent of AI-focused patents originated in the U.S., the authors of the index say; Japan and South Korea hold the next-highest number, at 16 percent each. South Korea and Taiwan have shown the most growth in patents.

“We can assert that AI is global,” stated the researchers, who say the report is meant to serve as a “comprehensive resource” for the public, researchers, and others to “develop intuitions about the complex field of AI.”

Interest in AI has jumped by many other measures, too. Undergraduate course enrollments in AI and machine learning have risen in universities that have computer science programs–and not just in the United States. At China’s Tsinghua University, enrollment in AI and machine learning courses was 16 times greater in 2017 than it was in 2010.

Venture capitalists are also placing bets on AI. From 2015 to 2018, the number of AI-focused startups backed by venture capital more than doubled, outpacing the increases for the overall pool of startups:

VC spending on artificial intelligence

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Economists and educators have speculated about how AI might influence not just teaching, but the future job market, and what schools need to do to prepare students to compete for careers. The AI Index shows a strong growth in the number of job openings with AI skill requirements.

Machine learning is the skill that is listed most often as a requirement, the report found. But deep learning–essentially work focused on imitating the human brain in processing data and creating patterns for decision-making–is the required skill growing at the fastest rate. It grew by 35 times between 2015 and 2017. Other AI-focused skills often required include natural language processing and robotics.

jobs requiring AI skills

 

 

 

 

 

 

Additionally, a growing number of companies in North America, China and other developing markets, and Europe are embedding “AI capabilities” in at least one function or business unit, says the report, citing a survey taken by McKinsey & Company.

Robotic process automation, machine learning, and conversational interfaces were among the AI capabilities cited most often.

This is the second year the index has been published. The new report, which was released in December, was broadened to include more data on AI’s presence outside North America.

Follow EdWeek Market Brief on Twitter @EdMarketBrief or connect with us on LinkedIn.


See also:

 

Eating Veggies in Space

SPACE TRAVEL

Eating your veggies, even in space
by Staff Writers
Oslo, Norway (SPX) Jan 07, 2019


Wolff found that the plants can “smell” or detect how much nutrition is available when she ran experiments in climate-regulated growth chambers in the Netherlands. Photo: Silje Wolff

Fresh food is so attractive to astronauts that they toasted with salad when they were able to cultivate a few lettuce heads on the International Space Station three years ago.

In 2021, beans are on the menu to be grown in space, planted in high-tech planters developed at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU).

“Astronauts like gardening and everything that reminds them of life on earth. They enjoy tending and watering the vegetables, and getting them to germinate,” says Silje Wolff, a plant physiologist at the Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Space (CIRiS), which is part of NTNU Social Research.

Wolff has just completed an experiment that involved growing lettuce for space. The lettuce was planted in artificial soil made from lava rock. The goal is for the plants to grow directly in water that is supplemented with plant nutrients.

“The dream of every astronaut is to be able to eat fresh food – like strawberries, cherry tomatoes or anything that’s really flavorful. Someday that will certainly be possible. We envision a greenhouse with several varieties of vegetables,” says Wolff.

The longest stays at the International Space Station have been six months. People travelling to Mars will need to be prepared to stay in space for at least a year.

The European Space Agency plans to build a lunar base in 2030 as a stopover on the way to Mars. NASA plans to fly directly to the planet with a target landing date of 2030.

“The way space travel works today, it’s almost impossible to take along all the resources you need. That’s why we have to develop a biological system so astronauts can produce their own food, and recycle all of the resources,” says Wolff.

Today’s astronauts eat only freeze-dried and vacuum-packed foods.

“Astronauts struggle with having little appetite. They often lose weight. Addressing the psychological aspect of eating something fresh is one of our goals. Vacuum-packed food doesn’t really remind you of food. Having something fresh that triggers the appetite and the right receptors in the brain is important,” Wolff says.

NTNU and CIRiS are collaborating with Italian and French researchers in their quest to cultivate plant-based food for long space journeys.

CIRiS tests the new equipment made by NTNU’s technical workshop – very sophisticated planters that regulate all the water, nutrients, gas and air the plants need. In space, all the water and food has to be recovered. This means that plant fertilization needs to be as precise as possible.

Wolff has conducted experiments in climate-regulated growth chambers in the Netherlands as one aspect of this research.

Of all the nutrients plants use, they use nitrogen the most. During her experiments, Wolff looked at different nutrient doses and how they affected the plants’ water uptake.

“We found that plants can, in a way, ‘smell’ the amount of nutrients available to them. When the nitrogen concentration is very low, the plant will absorb more water and thus more nitrogen until it reaches an optimal level. The plant has a mechanism that turns on when the nitrogen level is adequate. Then it adjusts both nitrogen and water absorption down,” says Wolff.

Everything that can be tested on Earth has now been carried out. The next step is to grow beans in space to observe the effect of no gravity on plants’ ability to transport water and absorb nutrients. Simulating the absence of gravity can’t be done on Earth.

The beans are placed in a centrifuge to sprout and grow in the space station. The centrifuge is rotated to create different amounts of gravity.

“The art of getting something to grow in space can be transferred to our planet,” Wolff said. “This is how we create a setup that produces both the microgravity conditions in the space station and the 1-g force that exists on Earth.”

That will allow her to compare how the different gravitational levels affect the plants in space. On Earth, gravity causes warm air to rise while cold air sinks. In the space station, air is more stationary, causing astronauts to always have a low-grade fever. Plants are also affected.

“Stationary air affects a layer on the underside of the leaf where the stoma pores are located. When gravity disappears, the boundary layer in the slit-shaped apertures thickens. This reduces evaporation and causes the leaf temperature to increase. Water vapour diffusion to the environment is an important part of plant regulation and can be compared with sweating to cool the body in humans and animals,” says Wolff.

Food production in cities offers an opportunity to produce more food in the most sustainable way. Cities don’t have much soil for cultivation, but a lot becomes possible if you can plant directly in water in indoor closed systems where all aspects of the climate are regulated.

“Recycling and precise fertilization are key to achieving more sustainable food production. By growing plants directly in water with dissolved nutrients, fertilization and irrigation are much easier to control,” says Wolff.

“The plants become less sensitive to nutritional deficiency because the roots are in direct contact with the nutrients. They’re always able to access new nutrients through the water, and can use absolutely all the nutrients available – unlike with soil that binds the nutrients and affects their availability to the roots. And the roots don’t rot when the water is mixed with a little oxygen,” she says.

Research Report: Testing New Concepts for Crop Cultivation in Space: Effects of Rooting Volume and Nitrogen Availability Silje A. Wolff, Carolina F. Palma, Leo Marcelis, Ann-Iren Kittang Jost and Sander H. van Delden. Life 2018, 8(4), 45

Side Note:

Mars Related STEAM++ International Student projects:

Bob Barboza is testing the soil from the base of volcanoes and a team of high school Jr. astronauts are using the soil for growing plants for Mars.   The students of Pedro Pierce High School on the Island of Fogo, Republic of Cabo Verde and students from the Long Beach Unified School District are working with the Barboza Space Center in southern California.  This year the Barboza Space Center Tiger teams will be studying the growth of cucumbers and beans.   http://www.BarbozaSpaceCenter.com