Cambodia Puerto Rico Needs Your Help

 

Light On Puerto Rico Theme Song JPEG.jpeg

The Lights On Puerto Rico Project

We are calling on students, teachers, musicians and music lovers to join us on the making of the theme song “Lights On Puerto Rico”.  This is a not for profit project to help students on  the island of Puerto Rico.   Our goal is to insure that we do not forget about Puerto Rico.  We want to keep Puerto Rico in the conversation.

You can help by singing our theme song and recording it by cell phone and sending it to Kids Talk Radio.  You can sing or play it by yourself or with a group.   We will provide the support, sheet music and permissions by PDF file.

This project will give you and your group an opportunity to help put a smile on a few faces in Puerto Rico.

If you have any other ideas that might help, we setup a special websites where our students are using STEAM++ (science, technology, engineering, visual and performing arts, mathematics, computer languages and foreign languages) to keep the conversation going.

These are tough times in the USA and around the world.  Maybe if we work tougher, we can make this world a better place.  This project is a good first step.

Some of our students and teachers are using ideas from our Occupy Mars project technology to find creative ways to use science, technology and engineering to help Puerto Rico.

We hope you will join us and help to put a smile on a few faces

Bob Barboza, Founder/Director

Barboza Space Center

Kids Talk Radio Science

suprschool@aol.com

www.KidsTalkRadioScience.com

www.KidsTalkRadioPuertoRico.WordPress.com

About the song: “ Light On Puerto Rico”

This song is a collaboration of Bob Barboza and Michael Vlatkovich. It was composed and arranged for the people of Puerto Rico and not for commercial purposes.  You need permission to use this song.  Send your email to suprschool@aol.com.  Most  people were recruited to participate in this program.  We are happy to communicate with you.

November 1, 2017.

© 2017, Light On Puerto Rico, All rights reserved.

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Cambodia Puerto Rico Needs Your Help

 

Light On Puerto Rico Theme Song JPEG.jpeg

The Lights On Puerto Rico Project

We are calling on students, teachers, musicians and music lovers to join us on the making of the theme song “Lights On Puerto Rico”.  This is a not for profit project to help students on  the island of Puerto Rico.   Our goal is to insure that we do not forget about Puerto Rico.  We want to keep Puerto Rico in the conversation.

You can help by singing our theme song and recording it by cell phone and sending it to Kids Talk Radio.  You can sing or play it by yourself or with a group.   We will provide the support, sheet music and permissions by PDF file.

This project will give you and your group an opportunity to help put a smile on a few faces in Puerto Rico.

If you have any other ideas that might help, we setup a special websites where our students are using STEAM++ (science, technology, engineering, visual and performing arts, mathematics, computer languages and foreign languages) to keep the conversation going.

These are tough times in the USA and around the world.  Maybe if we work tougher, we can make this world a better place.  This project is a good first step.

Some of our students and teachers are using ideas from our Occupy Mars project technology to find creative ways to use science, technology and engineering to help Puerto Rico.

We hope you will join us and help to put a smile on a few faces

Bob Barboza, Founder/Director

Barboza Space Center

Kids Talk Radio Science

suprschool@aol.com

www.KidsTalkRadioScience.com

www.KidsTalkRadioPuertoRico.WordPress.com

About the song: “ Light On Puerto Rico”

This song is a collaboration of Bob Barboza and Michael Vlatkovich. It was composed and arranged for the people of Puerto Rico and not for commercial purposes.  You need permission to use this song.  Send your email to suprschool@aol.com.  Most  people were recruited to participate in this program.  We are happy to communicate with you.

November 1, 2017.

© 2017, Light On Puerto Rico, All rights reserved.

Calculus Teachers Needed

The teachers at the Barboza Space Center are looking for fun space math projects using calculus.  We are teaching teams of high school students that are training to become Jr. astronauts, scientists and engineers.   Our students have labtop computers and scientific calculators.   Some of our students will be using slide rulers.  Here is a sample of a project on one sheet of paper.

We welcome you email:

Bob Barboza, Founder/Director

Barboza Space Center

Suprschool@aol.com

http://www.BarbozaSpaceCenter.WordPress.com

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How can students help Puerto Rico?

We are asking students, teachers and others to send their creative ideas and STEM & STEAM++ projects to help Puerto Rico keep their lights on and their water clean enough to drink.   We invited you to visit our new website and see what we have so far.

Puerto Rico STEM Projects.png

Do what you can to keep the conversations and solutions for Puerto Rico going.

http://www.KidsTalkRadioPuertoRico.WordPress.com

How can you help?

Bob Barboza

Barboza Space Center, Kids Talk Radio Science

Suprschool@aol.com

 

*STEAM++ (science, technology, engineering, visual and performing arts, mathematics, computer languages and foreign languages.

How can students in the US and Cambodia help students in Puerto Rico?

Kids Talk Radio Science Helping Puerto Rico

We are calling on students from around the world to help other students in Puerto Rico.  We are looking for your creative ideas to make drinking water safe to drink.  We are looking to use solar energy to to create light and to charge cell phones.

What other ideas do you have?

Visit the new Puerto Rico Website today and you will see what we are starting to do to help fellow students on the island.

www.KidsTalkRadioPuertoRico.WordPress.com

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How Can High School Students in Cambodia Help High School Students in Puerto Rico?

We need to start the conversations?

 

Kids Talk Radio Science Helping Puerto Rico

We are calling on students from around the world to help other students in Puerto Rico.  We are looking for your creative ideas to make drinking water safe to drink.  We are looking to use solar energy to to create light and to charge cell phones.

What other ideas do you have?

Visit the new Puerto Rico Website today and you will see what we are starting to do to help fellow students on the island.

www.KidsTalkRadioPuertoRico.WordPress.com

main_900-1.jpg

170907-hurricane-irma-puerto-rico-njs-835a_f49999cd27a4f1cfd711bac26c5436cf.nbcnews-ux-2880-1000.jpg

Circuit Visualization.jpg

We need a soil sample from Cambodia

High School students working at the Barboza Space Center are working on growing better plants for Mars.  www.BarbozaSpaceCenter.com

We need a test-tube size sample of soil from your country for experiments we will be conducting in July, 2018 in Los Angeles and Long Beach, California.  We want to collaborate with other high school students from around the world.   Our project is the Occupy Mars Learning Adventures.  

Contact: Bob Barboza at (562) 221-1780 Cell.

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Martian soil

Curiosity‘s view of Martian soil and boulders after crossing the “Dingo Gap” sand dune (February 9, 2014; raw color).

Martian soil is the fine regolith found on the surface of Mars. Its properties can differ significantly from those of terrestrial soil. The term Martian soil typically refers to the finer fraction of regolith. On Earth, the term “soil” usually includes organic content.[1] In contrast, planetary scientists adopt a functional definition of soil to distinguish it from rocks.[2] Rocks generally refer to 10 cm scale and larger materials (e.g., fragments, breccia, and exposed outcrops) with high thermal inertia, with areal fractions consistent with the Viking Infrared Thermal Mapper (IRTM) data, and immobile under current aeolian conditions.[2] Consequently, rocks classify as grains exceeding the size of cobbles on the Wentworth scale.

This approach enables agreement across Martian remote sensing methods that span the electromagnetic spectrum from gamma to radio waves. ‘‘Soil’’ refers to all other, typically unconsolidated, material including those sufficiently fine-grained to be mobilized by wind.[2] Soil consequently encompasses a variety of regolith components identified at landing sites. Typical examples include: bedform armor, clasts, concretions, drift, dust, rocky fragments, and sand. The functional definition reinforces a recently proposed genetic definition of soil on terrestrial bodies (including asteroids and satellites) as an unconsolidated and chemically weathered surficial layer of fine-grained mineral or organic material exceeding centimeter scale thickness, with or without coarse elements and cemented portions.[1]

Martian dust generally connotes even finer materials than Martian soil, the fraction which is less than 30 micrometres in diameter. Disagreement over the significance of soil’s definition arises due to the lack of an integrated concept of soil in the literature. The pragmatic definition “medium for plant growth” has been commonly adopted in the planetary science community but a more complex definition describes soil as “(bio)geochemically/physically altered material at the surface of a planetary body that encompasses surficial extraterrestrial telluric deposits.” This definition emphasizes that soil is a body that retains information about its environmental history and that does not need the presence of life to form.

Watching a Solar Eclipse from Cambodia

How is the sun completely blocked in an eclipse?

Image of moon covering sun in a solar eclipse

In this picture of a solar eclipse, the moon is beginning to move from in front of the sun. Credit: NASA

During a total solar eclipse, the moon passes between Earth and the sun. This completely blocks out the sun’s light. However, the moon is about 400 times smaller than the sun. How can it block all of that light?


It all has to do with the distance between Earth and the sun and Earth and the moon.

an illustration of the moon blocking the sun's light during the August 2017 eclipse

An illustration showing the Earth, moon, and sun during the August 21, 2017 eclipse. Image credit: NASA’s Scientific Visualization Studio

When objects are closer to us, they appear to be bigger than objects that are far away. For example, most stars in the night sky look like tiny white dots of light. In reality, many of those stars are larger than our sun—they are just much farther away from Earth!

Even though the moon is 400 times smaller than the sun, it’s also about 400 times closer to Earth than the sun is. This means that from Earth, the moon and the sun appear to be roughly the same size in the sky.

an illustration showing that the sun and the moon appear to be the same size in the sky, but the moon is much closer to Earth than the sun is

Image credit: NASA

So, when the moon comes between Earth and the sun during a total solar eclipse, the moon appears to completely cover up the light from the sun.

However, it won’t always be this way.


Total solar eclipses won’t be around forever!

The moon’s orbit is changing. In fact, the moon’s orbit grows about 1.5 inches (3.8 cm) larger every year. As the moon’s orbit takes it farther and farther away from Earth, the moon will appear smaller and smaller in our sky.

This occasionally happens now. The moon’s orbit isn’t perfectly round. That means that sometimes the moon is slightly farther away from Earth than it is at other times. Sometimes the moon is far enough away that it doesn’t create a total solar eclipse. In this case, the moon obscures most of the sun, but a thin ring of the sun remains visible around the moon.

However, once the moon’s growing orbit takes it approximately 14,600 miles (23,496 km) away from Earth, it will always be too far away to completely cover the sun. That won’t happen for a long time though. If the moon’s orbit grows only 1.5 inches every year, it will take more than 600 million years for total solar eclipses to completely disappear!

article last updated May 22, 2017

Studying About Mars from Earth

El Morro National Monument

Barboza Space Center News:   We have just returned from our summer New Mexico geology field trip. We are always looking to compare and contract Earth and Mars. We invite you to visit our most recent photo essay below.   In addition, we are paving the way for our 2018 Barboza Space Center Tiger Teams from Australia, South Korea and Cabo Verde.  We visited the El Malpas National Monument to continue our studies of volcanoes in New Mexico and Cabo Verde.    Plans are underway to study Mars from New Mexico. You can follow our programs by visiting www.BarbozaSpaceCenter.com

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Photo Essay: Bob Barboza July, 2017, New Mexico
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El Morro National Monument
IUCN category V (protected landscape/seascape)
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Location Cibola County, New Mexico, USA
Nearest city El Morro, New Mexico
Coordinates 35°2′18″N 108°21′12″WCoordinates: 35°2′18″N 108°21′12″W
Area 1,278.72 acres (5.1748 km2)
1,039.92 acres (420.84 ha) federal
Created December 8, 1906
Visitors 59,422 (in 2016)[1]
Governing body National Park Service
Website El Morro National Monument
El Morro National Monument
El Morro National Monument is located in New Mexico

El Morro National Monument

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Area 221 acres (89 ha)
Built 1605
NRHP Reference # 66000043[2]
NMSRCP # 59
Significant dates
Added to NRHP October 15, 1966
Designated NMSRCP May 21, 1971

El Morro National Monument is located on an ancient east-west trail in western New Mexico. The main feature of this National Monument is a great sandstone promontory with a pool of water at its base.

As a shaded oasis in the western U.S. desert, this site has seen many centuries of travelers. The remains of a mesa top pueblo are atop the promontory where between about 1275 to 1350 AD, up to 1500 people lived in this 875 room pueblo. The Spaniard explorers called it El Morro (The Headland). The Zuni Indians call it “A’ts’ina” (Place of writings on the rock). Anglo-Americans called it Inscription Rock. Travelers left signatures, names, dates, and stories of their treks. While some of the inscriptions are fading, there are still many that can be seen today, some dating to the 17th century. Among the Anglo-American emigrants who left their names there in 1858 were several members of the Rose-Baley Party, including Leonard Rose and John Udell.[3] Some petroglyphs and carvings were made by the Ancestral Puebloan centuries before Europeans started making their mark. In 1906, U.S. federal law prohibited further carving.

The many inscriptions, water pool, pueblo ruins, and top of the promontory are all accessible via park trails.

It is on the Trails of the Ancients Byway, one of the designated New Mexico Scenic Byways.[4]

International Mars Art Contest

Mars Society to Hold Int’l Student Mars Art Contest
Two Weeks Remaining until Submission Deadline (May 31)
The Mars Society is sponsoring a Student Mars Art (SMArt) Contest, inviting youth from around the world to depict the human future on the planet Mars. Young artists from grades 4 through 12 are invited to submit up to three works of art each, illustrating any part of the human future on the Red Planet, including the first landing, human field exploration, operations at an early Mars base, the building of the first Martian cities, terraforming the Red Planet and other related human settlement concepts.

The SMArt Contest will be divided into three categories: Upper Elementary (grades 4-6), Junior High (grades 7-9), and High School (Grades 10-12). Cash prizes of $1,000, $500 and $250, as well as trophies, will be given out to the first, second and third place winners of each section. There will also be certificates of honorable mention for those artists who don’t finish in the top three, but whose work is nevertheless judged to be particularly meritorious.

The winning works of art will be posted on the Mars Society web site and may also be published as part of a special book about Mars art. In addition, winners will be invited to come to the 20th Annual International Mars Society Convention at the University of California, Irvine September 7-10, 2017 to display and talk about their art.

Mars art will consist of still images, which may be composed by traditional methods, such as pencil, charcoal, watercolors or paint, or by computerized means. Works of art must be submitted via a special online form (http://nextgen.marssociety.org/mars-art) in either PDF or JPEG format with a 10 MB limit per image. The deadline for submissions is May 31, 2017, 5:00 pm MST. By submitting art to the contest, participating students grant the Mars Society non-exclusive rights to publish the images on its web site or in Kindle paper book form.

Speaking about the SMArt Contest, Mars Society President Dr. Robert Zubrin said, “The imagination of youth looks to the future. By holding the SMArt Contest, we are inviting young people from all over the world to use art to make visible the things they can see with their minds that the rest of us have yet to see with our own eyes. Show us the future, kids. From imagination comes reality. If we can see it, we can make it.”

All questions about the Mars Society’s SMArt Contest can be submitted to: Marsart@marssociety.org.